Aparthotels and Gen Z snacks

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#1 Why do hotel chains have so many different brands?🤔

  • Aloft
  • Westin
  • St Regis

What do these 3 hotels have in common?

They're all owned by one company - Marriott.

But why is this?

Well, according to the experts over at MorningBrew, a lot of it is down to the Asset Light Business Model that many hotel companies follow.


The Asset Light Model in hotels focuses on owning properties so hotel companies can focus on what they do best; managing their brand and offering franchises.

This way, they cut down on heavy investments and risks linked to property ownership, allowing for quicker growth and more operational flexibility - all without the burden of bricks and mortar.

If you work in the hotel industry, you probably already know most of this.

But this MorningBrew's video can give you a quick and more in-depth look at this business model.

#2 Hotel snacks, anybody? No thanks... 😴

Let's set the scene: You've just checked in, it's late, and the only food within arm's reach is a sad selection of snacks.

Let's face it, grabbing a bag of Lay's from the honesty bar is often a move of desperation rather than desire.


As Fast Company Magazine highlights, with Gen Z reshaping marketing, why not let them reinvent the hotel snacking scene too?

It's time hotels caught up with the times, making the hotel lobby a showcase of local culture and contemporary taste.

After all, in an era where snacks can be a statement, your midnight munchies should be as memorable as your stay.

#3 You can run, but you can't hide from the reviews! 😨

According to Booking Layer's blog, about 80% of people check out reviews before booking their stay, and most of them go for places with better ratings, even if the price is the same as others.


Plus, more than half of travelers won't even consider staying somewhere if there aren't any reviews to read.

We all know how difficult it can be to persuade a customer to leave a good review, even if they had an amazing time. Booking Layer goes a little deeper into how to change this by:

  • The power of asking
  • Adopting a personalized approach
  • Giving the guests direction
  • & being proactive with unsatisfied guests

It's a great read; don't miss out on this take!

#4 Toothbrushes for chopsticks 🥢

In a recent X post, @levelsio noted that if hotels just added basic kitchens, Airbnb would be out of business.

You know what, we totally agree.

*Late check-in due to a delayed flight.*
You're ravenous but have sourced an instant ramen bowl. Great!
Ok, so the room won't have a kitchen to cook this, but a kettle should suffice.
The ramen is cooking gently. Not ideal, but it is what it is.

Oh no. No utensils 😭


Now, we either burn our mouths trying to drink/eat it, or we use two of our packed toothbrushes to try and use as chopsticks.

Wouldn't this all just be easier if hotels provided a kitchen area in the room?

The main (and obvious) reason to not add kitchens to the rooms is the lost F&B revenue and lower TRevPAR.

But there are some (not many) examples, where a restaurant and room kitchen can co-exist.

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